Manufactured Home Septic Tanks Guide For 2021: Keep Your Home Sewage And Odor Free

Homebuyers normally prefer to buy homes with “on-board” septic tanks i.e. the home comes with its own septic tank already built in the ground.

This can be a hit and miss – while it may save you money because you don’t need to build it yourself, you may not understand the whole architecture of the system in the event of a malfunction.

The second option involves buying a home and adding your preferable septic tank system – you understand everything about it and can set it up whichever way you want.

Ready-made commercial septic tanks are often referred to as plastic septic tanks to create a distinction between them and their fixed make-it-yourself alternatives which are almost always made of concrete (although not all commercial septic tanks are plastic).

Plastic tanks are probably the most affordable way of sanitation and waste disposal.

Unlike their fixed concrete counterparts, horizontal plastic septic tanks are manufactured from polyethylene – a kind of hardy chemically inert plastic – which does not permit plant roots to spread and penetrate through the walls of the tank.

Top-quality plastic septic tanks will neither crack nor allow seepage.

Eight Manufactured Home Septic Tank Shopping Factors

Septic tanks are some of the most challenging fixtures you could add to your home because once they are installed, you can’t make major changes to them unless you wish to replace the whole system with a new one.

Are you in need of one? Consider these factors when shopping for it:

  • Types
  • Size
  • Septic Tank Options
  • Local Regulations
  • Maintenance Cost
  • Budget
  • Consult the Experts
  • Brand

1. Types

Not long ago, the whole idea of septic tanks was nothing but a fixed concrete tank buried in the property somewhere in your backyard.

This design was not cheap to construct, but it certainly wasn’t the most expensive installation that homebuyers had to put on their property.

Most older properties still feature these basic septic units even though a big part of the current regulations don’t allow the addition of this type of septic tank.

There are several types of commercial septic tanks. Before you even consider any of the available types, it is recommended that you familiarize yourself with your area’s regulations concerning the design of septic tank systems.

Whether you prefer the plastic version or the precast concrete option, most septic systems out there can be placed in 3 general categories, all based upon function:

Pressure Distribution

These tanks use pressure distribution to create an external artificial pressure that forces wastewater through the filtration system

Advanced Treatment, beneath the ground

These tanks are equipped with underground filtering systems to ensure maximum safety. Note that this type of septic tank demands enormous maintenance efforts.

Standard Gravity

These septic tanks are designed in such a way that they task the natural force of gravity with pulling the wastewater throughout the filtration system.

Note that septic tank designs in these general groups can vary quite widely according to their composition materials.

As aforementioned, there are commercial septic tank products made from precast concrete or similar materials or fiberglass.

Others are manufactured from steel or plastic.

Steel septic tanks may easily sound like the most durable and strongest option to choose from, but in fact, they are the least popular. Steel septic tanks rarely function past 20 – 25 years, and can even rust earlier than this depending on the surrounding conditions.

All types of septic tanks require frequent pumping, so the objective isn’t necessarily to select the largest option.

Still, it is recommended that you choose a strong product enough for your type of land terrain, household needs, and area so that you don’t have to deal with a leaking septic system.

2. Size

What size of the septic tank would be perfect for your home?

Tanks are available in many different sizes. The perfect size for your needs can depend on such factors as the size of the home and sanitation demands.

For instance, one-bedroom homes may only require a small plastic septic tank.

A five-bedroom home would probably demand something larger because the total number of individuals living in the home will increase the wastewater output.

The general rule is to buy a septic tank slightly bigger than what you need (one size larger) as dictated by the total number of individuals living in your home.

That way, when your whole family arrives for a Thanksgiving dinner, your home won’t have to struggle with an overloaded system.

Also bear in mind that you will need to pump the tank every 2 – 5 years, so going for a smaller tank can save you a significant amount of money in a short while, but may cost you dearly in pumping fees if you use it for a long time as it will need to be pumped out more often.

It is worth realizing that you can’t make further changes to the tank once you set up everything.

There’s just one part you can control though: the amount of water discharging into the system.

And since each septic system has a maximum capacity set for it, you should take all the precautions to never exceed it.

3. Septic Tank Options

Septic tank systems do more than just store wastewater.

They are also tasked with dispersing the water safely through a type of filter, neutralizing the toxins in the wastewater, and restoring the harmless water to your local groundwater system from where it can be obtained again for use.

Since the filtration method often affects the same same water you use and drink, it goes unsaid that the filtering system MUST BE highly effective at its job.

Advanced treatment systems in some septic systems don’t come cheap, but you can count on their efficiency and effectiveness.

Aerobic Systems

Residential projects typically take between $13,000 and $20,000 to set up.

A good example of an advanced septic system is the aerobic septic system.

Aerobic systems use regular oxygen to help speed up the decay process, thus reducing the overall amount of filtration time.

However, the fast the decay process, the more problems you create in the system itself, and also the more maintenance care you will need to do.

Glendon Biofilters

Other options include septic tanks with drain fields and septic tank filter, which often consists of textile, sand, or a newer technique called Glendon Biofilters.

Sand filters aren’t installed new anymore. Rather, you are likely to buy them together with your property as an “onboard” system. Typically, mounds of sand are used instead.

Glendon Biofilters are usually used when a significant rock system or groundwater is located close to the surface.

These filters are made of multiple layers of gravel and sand placed in a well-sealed box or mesh built into the holding soil with a slim sand fill put over the topmost layer of the whole area.

They work impressively, especially in areas that don’t permit the installation of other systems or where the soil isn’t favorable for conventional systems.

However, they are aesthetically unpleasant, so many homeowners tend to opt for a combo of other kinds of popular septic tank filters whether they require drain fields or not.

4. Local Regulations

Septic tank systems interact with the environment by expelling the filtered wastes and water into the soil. A malfunctioning system will certainly leak the wastewater into the surrounding environment and groundwater and create a health hazard.

As such, many localized authorities find it necessary to spell out rules and standards regarding how these systems are installed and how they interact with the environment.

Before you purchase one, you need to familiarize yourself with local regulations and standards.

The EPA provides some basic details here, but the finer regulations that govern the installation of these systems are decided at the local level.

There is a need to understand the local standards regarding different types of septic tank systems (concrete, plastic, steel, etc.).

Also, you need to understand the specific designs allowed in your area, and if the regulations require you to install a septic tank draining field or septic tank filters.

Another thing worth considering is the proximity of your tank to the property line.

Many homeowners don’t pay the needed attention to these details partly because they are often hidden from view.

Local regulations may expect you to place the tank a certain distance away from the property line. This positioning is often designed to prevent the drainage from seeping into the property of your neighbor.

5. Maintenance Cost

It is also worth asking about the maintenance costs of the whole system. Some septic tanks are less demanding when it comes to maintenance.

Choose a tank that will require very little maintenance efforts beyond the usual pumping.

Others, such as those involving aerobic treatment of wastewater, require a significant amount of electricity to run.

Such systems will cause you to incur recurrent expenses just by operating them. You will also have to maintain them more closely because an electrical failure might cause septic failure.

6. Budget

It’s important to bear in mind when preparing a budget for your septic tank, that these units must be pumped out once every 2 – 5 years.

So trying to save a lump sum of cash on a small product may return to cost you a great deal of money on more frequent maintenance jobs or frequent draining because of the small capacity.

Plan and prepare your budget for a capacity/size slightly bigger than your needs so that you are prepared for all those above-average situations.

Conventional systems (or gravity-based systems) are the most affordable of the lot and also the easiest to maintain.

However, many regulations ban them because of their overly simplistic approach to sanitation.

They cost between $4,000 – $5,000. A price tag in those brackets can get you a decent Conventional pump system designed to disperse the wastewater to a complimentary drain field upslope from the home.

Pressure Manifold systems are very much the same as conventional pumps – they have distributed up the slope into your drain field. They cost anything between $6,000 – $8,000.

Low-Pressure Pipe septic tank systems are designed to be installed on steep slopes and low soil depths. They run between $12,000 – $15,000.

They can be split into two:

  • Drip Disposal Anaerobic septic systems permit you to use soil depths and steep slopes of less than 18”. They cost between $17,000 – $25,000.
  • Drip Disposal Aerobic septic systems are designed for the very steepest slopes or soil depths of up to 13”. They sell for anything between $25,000 – $40,000.

So, what does this show you about budgeting for your septic tank?

It will cost you a minimum of $5,000 to start your journey. Take a second look at your home. Does it sit on a sloped or flat surface?

The sloppier the landscape is, the more capital you will need to get it started and going.

Also, check the amount of good topsoil you have on the property?

More soil means low cost of installation hence the less capital you will need to get your septic tank system working. Budget and plan accordingly.

7. Consult the Experts

Isn’t it worth doing some research before buying a $10,000 (or even more) item?

It’s even more necessary when you want the product to last reasonably many years without remarkable maintenance or replacement costs.

Septic tank systems aren’t one-size-fits-all pieces of sanitation equipment. They must be carefully customized to fit your unique challenges that come with your home and your property.

Also, they must be acquired and installed in line with your local regulations.

This research, therefore, can save you a great deal of money not just in initial acquisition costs but in running costs as well.

It can also go a long way to prevent you from contaminating your land or breaking the entire septic system with poorly maintenance.

You can log on to the internet and try to learn the precautions, the best way to install the system, where to find the best product, and – more importantly – all the regulations that apply to you in your location.

You can even try to do some relevant mathematical equations to help you figure out the perfect size fit and best combinations for your specific needs.

You can set out for the installation location, dig a hole into the ground and determine how far down you can go before you hit a rock or before the ground starts to get soggy.

8. Brand

Just as you would do with any other product, you want septic made by a reputable brand.

You also want a brand that has better warranties on its products and one that upholds the highest safety standards.

You can find reliable products from some of America’s top tank makers in places like Home Depot, LOWES, and Tank Depot.

Some of the best tanks on the market are made by:

Ready-made commercial septic tanks are often referred to as plastic septic tanks to create a distinction between them and their fixed make-it-yourself alternatives which are almost always made of concrete.

However, note that not all commercial septic tanks are plastic; there are cast concrete, steel, and fiberglass varieties.

There are several types of commercial septic tanks. Before you even consider any of the available types, it is recommended that you familiarize yourself with your area’s regulations concerning the design of septic tank systems.

All types of septic tanks require frequent pumping, so the objective isn’t necessarily to select the largest option.

Still, it is recommended that you choose a strong product enough for your type of land terrain, household needs, and area so that you don’t have to deal with a leaking septic system.

The general rule is to buy a septic tank slightly bigger than what you need (one size larger) as dictated by the total number of individuals living in your home.

That way, when your whole family arrives for a Thanksgiving dinner, your home won’t have to struggle with an overloaded system.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: When does a septic tank need to be emptied?

A: A sewer disposal tank, if not well taken care of, can end up becoming a mess in your home. Talk of the odor, slow drains and pooling of water around the drain field of your septic system.

When the washing machine in your home and the toilet starts getting sluggish, and you are having trouble flushing it, you should check your septic system for emptying.

Preferably sewer tanks should be emptied every one to two years or so, but this also depends on the size of the tank and the number of occupants in a home.

When the level of sludge builds up to a point where it is almost blocking the tank, it requires checkup. If it is allowed to block the tank, the damage can become more expensive on you.

Q: How often should a septic tank be pumped?

A: A small family tank differs in size and capacity from a large family tank.

Different systems have various sizes, and their levels should determine how often they should get pumped.

Young members of a family use more water than the elderly and thus the sewer disposal tanks for the young family members will get full more often and need to be pumped many times compared to the old.

The volume of wastewater added daily and the type of solids in the waste water streaming to the tank will greatly determine how often pumping should be done.

As more solids clog in the absorption area of the tank, the solids begin to obstruct the movement of the wastewater into the soil.

The waste water around the soaking area should be pumped to open up the way for the flow.

The sewer tank should get checked before the captured solids accumulate to the point where these solids get carried with the sewer effluent to the absorption area.

Q: How much are septic tank lids?

A: A cover to your sewer tank may not seem that significant, but it is, in reality, one of the most crucial items in a sewer system.

Putting a weak lid or none at all will allow bad sewer smell out of the tank into your home, and this may not be that pleasant.

Foreign materials may also find their way into the disposal tank if it is not sealed properly and the sewer system may end up blocking.

The price of a particular septic tank will get determined by the size and type of the sewer disposal tank itself.

Q: What are septic tank risers?

A: A septic tank riser is a long round pipe that is usually placed over the Septic tank clean out the opening so as to make the opening big and close to the ground level.

These help the septic pumping people to reach the septic tank cleanout cover with ease.

A sewer disposal tank needs cleaning and pumping once in a while. For this process to take place effectively, the whole tank needs to be accessed. The installation of a septic tank riser is necessary.

Q: What are septic tank worms?

A: A septic tank is usually known to harbor parasites that cause diseases while septic tank leaks are known to contaminate drinking water.

These are parasites that can survive in areas that are heavily polluted and with little oxygen.

Septic tank worms are found in sewer disposal tanks because the tanks are typically sealed completely and very little air allowed.

Q: How much does a septic tank inspection cost?

A: A sewer disposal tank needs to be inspected from time to time.

homeowner can decide to do the inspection or pay for the services. These cost a few hundred dollars but can turn costly if the tank goes for long without check up

Q: Are septic tank filters necessary?

A: A filter in the tank protects the absorption area from blockage.

Septic tank filters are important because they make sure that no unwanted solids are allowed into the soaking areas of the system.

Proper use of filters enables efficient functioning of the sewer disposal tank.

Q: Are septic tank additives necessary?

A: Sewer disposal systems rely on bacteria to decompose the solids and contaminants in wastewater.

It is therefore not necessary to add odor control additives. If the tank has regular cleaning and pumping, then it should be able to last for many years.

Q: What cleaners are septic tank safe?

A: The day to day detergents, fabric softeners, shampoos, and bath soap, at the proportions of home use are well dilute when utilized in the septic tank and they are okay to use for sewer system cleaning.

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